Banded Everyday Tee

Banded Fav T1

Do you remember {this} cap-sleeve Everyday Tee that Jen posted way back when?

Well, I fell in love with it, and put out about 5 of them.  (you’ll recognize some of the shirts today if you go back and compare.)  It’s a great pattern, and the shirt is so comfy that those shirts are my go-to shirts when I hit my closet in the morning.  BUT…after a while, I started to think they were “tuck-in-only” shirts.  Which, for me, only happens when I wear a high-waisted skirt or something…(aka: hardly ever!)  I like mine a little longer, I think…

Banded Fav T21

So, I thought I’d try adding a band to the bottom of them to finish them off a little differently…

A couple of them, I still had some left-over fabric for… that was no problem.  But there were a couple of shirts that I LOVED the print for, and didn’t have any left over fabric.  So, I improvised.  Is it obvious on this one?

Banded Fav T3

(I just used a plain white knit, since it was a pink and white stripe original shirt)  I don’t think it’s obvious.  But then, I tried this one…which is totally obvious, but maybe with the pocket, it looks like I did it on purpose?


Banded Fav T5

I don’t know…any way, so here’s an add-on tutorial to Jen’s original post {here} to tell you how to quickly add-on a band to the bottom of your cap-sleeve tee so you don’t have to save it for those seldom ‘tuck-it-in’ days!

Here ya go:

Here’s my shirt the way I originally made it…Are you cringing that I used white thread on my serger on a charcoal shirt?  I know…When I made this shirt the first time, I was too scared to re-thread my serger.  White it is.  don’t judge.

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anyway, I don’t know what’s wrong with me, but when I hem the bottom of some knit shirts, it goes all wonky on me, or sometimes the hem flips up so everyone can see that I serged it with white thread.  anyway…tuck it in! or….

cut off that hem, right above the stitching line.

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After cutting off the hem, you’ll be left with the below.  Without stretching the shirt at all, measure the distance from seam to seam.  Mine was about 19 inches.  If you add on an extra half inch for seam allowances, that gives you the length of fabric you’ll need to cut to create your band.


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My bands are 3 inches thick, so in order to create the same look that I have in the above pictures, you’ll need to cut a 6 1/2″ wide width of fabric.

Simply, for a 19″ wide shirt, cut 2 19 1/2″ x 6 1/2″ bands.

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With right-sides-together, serge the two side seams together on both sides.

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Now you’ve created a big loop of fabric.  Now fold it in half so that the two raw edges meet, like so:  (I like to match the side seams at this point so that I can easily mark the center-front and center-back of my band.)

Likewise, mark the center-front and center-back of your tee shirt so that you can match markings when you sew it together in the next step.

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Now that you’ve marked your center markings, and you know where the side-center’s are because of the side seams, you can place your shirt into the folded loop of fabric so that all three raw edges meet.  Be sure to match and pin both the center-front and center-back as well as the two side seams together, making sure that all raw edges are together.


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Pinned and ready to go:

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The last step is to serge the raw edges together.  Start at a side seam, and be sure to stretch the knit so that all three layers of fabric are nice and straight.  When you get to each pin, remove the pin, and re-adjust and stretch to the next pin.

all done!  Easy…just like I like it!

Banded Fav T4

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